Using Page Objects for More Readable Feature Specs

Posted by John Wood on Jun 1, 2015 5:24:36 PM

Feature specs are great for making sure that a web application works from end to end. But feature specs are code, and like all other code, the specs must be readable and maintainable if you are to get a return on your investment. Those who have worked with large Capybara test suites know that they can quickly become a stew of CSS selectors. It can make the tests difficult to read and maintain if CSS selectors are sprinkled around through the suite. This is even more problematic if the name of the CSS selector doesn’t accurately reflect what the element actually is or does.

Introducing Page Objects

This is where Page Objects come in. Per Martin Fowler:

A page object wraps an HTML page, or fragment, with an application-specific API, allowing you to manipulate page elements without digging around in the HTML.

Page Objects are great for describing the page structure and elements in one place, a class, which can then be used by your tests to interact with the page. This makes your tests easier to read and understand, which in turn makes them easier to maintain. If used correctly, changing the id or class of an element that is used heavily in your feature specs should only require updating the page object, and nothing else.

Let’s look at an example. Here is a basic test that uses the Capybara DSL to interact with a page:

Let’s take a look at at that same spec re-written to use SitePrism, an outstanding implementation of Page Objects in Ruby:

In the SitePrism version of the spec, the majority of the CSS selectors have moved from the test into the CompanyOfficePage class. This not only makes the selectors easier to change, but it also makes the test easier to read now that the spec is simply interacting with an object. In addition, it makes it easier for other specs to work with this same page since they no longer need knowledge about the structure of the page or the CSS selectors on the page.

While SitePrism’s ability to neatly abstract away most knowledge about CSS selectors from the spec is pretty handy, that is only the beginning.

Repeating Elements, Sections, and Repeating Sections

Page Objects really shine when you completely model the page elements that your spec needs to interact with. Not all pages are as simple as the one in the above example. Some have repeating elements, some have sections of related elements, and some have repeating sections of related elements. SitePrism contains functionality for modeling all of these. Defining the proper repeating elements, sections, and repeating sections in your page object allows you to interact with those elements and sections via SitePrism APIs that make your specs much easier to write, read, and understand.

Testing for Existence and Visibility

SitePrism provides a series of methods for each element defined in the page object. Amongst the most useful of these methods are easy ways to test for the existence and visibility of an element.

Using the Capybara DSL, the best way to check for the existence of an element is to expect that a CSS selector that uniquely identifies the element can be found on the page:

This becomes a bit easier with SitePrism, as we no longer have to use the CSS selector if our page object has an element defined:

Visibility checks are also simpler. Asserting that an element exists in the DOM, and is visible, can be a bit convoluted using the Capybara DSL:

Using SitePrism, this simply becomes:

The above code will wait until #blah is added to the DOM and becomes visible. If that does not happen in the time specified by Capybara.default_wait_time, then an exception will be raised and the test will fail.

Waiting for Elements

Using the above visibility check is a great way to ensure that it is safe to proceed with a portion of a test that requires an element be in the DOM and visible, like a test that would click on a given element. Waiting for an element to be not only in the DOM, but visible, is a great way eliminate race conditions in tests where the click target is dynamically added to the DOM.

Using Capybara Implicit Waits

By default, SitePrisim will not implicitly wait for an element to appear in the DOM when it is referenced in the test. This can lead to flakey tests. Because of this, we highly recommend telling SitePrism to use implicit waits in your project.

Summary

SitePrism is a fantastic tool. If you write feature specs, I highly recommend you check it out. It will make your specs eaiser to write, and maintain.

 

Topics: rails, testing, capybara

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